Backlog Prioritization *Further Refined*


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A few months ago I shared a blog post on updated prioritization of software backlog. This has been further refined to simplify the field values and effectively signify the cumulative effect of various parameters.

Check out the new framework here.

For more details on the prioritization approach and right mix of features, see the original post here.

Cheers!

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Synopsis: The Art of Product Management


I was fortunate enough to bump into a presentation from Sachin Rekhi (@sachinrekhi) called The Art of Product Management.

VSDE

It was an excellent read. Here’s a synopsis from it, for my product management friends.

Product managers drive the Vision, Strategy, Design, and Execution of their product.

Vision – articulates how the world will be a better place when you succeed

  • A compelling vision articulates how the world will be a better place when you succeed
  • Get excited about being at least one step forward, one step closer to it
  • Best format: write a customer oriented vision narrative. Jeff Bezos expects a 6-page narrative!!
  • A vision is valuable only if it inspires the entire team
  • Communicate the vision — the power of repetition — just as it takes 7 impressions to garner a response to a marketing message, you need to constantly repeat your vision. Ask your team about what they’re doing and gauge if they are communicating along the lines of the vision, using words & phrases from the vision.

Strategy – iterate & refine until you find product-market fit and you are dominant in your market

  • It’s about how are you going to win
  • A vision should be stable, but your strategy needs to be iterated on and refined until you find product-market fit and until you are dominant in your target markets. Again refine to expand to new markets and find product-market fit there.
  • A better fit leads to a more appealing product for the target market
  • A faster fit means the product will enjoy maximum differentiation for a longer period of time
  • Best format: Product-Market Fit Hypotheses
    1. Target Audience — bulls eye of your very best potential customers
    2. Problem You’re Solving — it’s important to articulate the problem independent of the solution, get to the root of the problem than scratching the symptoms, fall in love with the problem you’re solving for your customers and not with the solution
    3. Value Propositions — not the feature list, but the promise to your customers on the value you will deliver for them
    4. Strategic Differentiation — why is your solution 10x better than the leading alternatives
    5. Competition — how will your solution win against direct competitors and indirect alternatives
    6. Acquisition Strategy — how will you find & attract your potential customers in a cost-effective way
    7. Monetization Strategy — what are your primary and secondary ways to make money, is there strong willingness to pay
    8. KPIs — what are the right metrics for you to know if you are headed in the right direction. Spend time frequently (almost everyday) reviewing critical metrics & dashboards.
  • Minimize your dimensions of innovation. Don’t innovate on all aforementioned dimensions, instead innovate on few and use best practices for the rest.

Design – keep it simple and bring emotional intelligence

  • Work hard and iterate to keep it simple
  • A compelling design delivers a useful, usable, and delightful experience to your customers, by bringing emotional intelligence to your design
  • Develop personas – a persona typically describes the goals, pain points, behaviors, and psychology associated with members of a particular segment. Give them a name, a profile image, and sometimes associate a background history with them. A team usually develops one or more personas to represent the core audience of users they are optimizing their product/experience.
  • Increase Exposure Hours — it is the amount of time your team spends with observing customers
  • Delight through attention to detail and by making people feel accomplished
  • Measure delight through NPS

Execution – it’s not about project management it’s doing whatever it takes to win

  • Be relentless, it determines whether you’ll make your vision a reality
  • You must spend about 60% of your time in execution, else it will go wrong
  • Execution is not about project management, but doing whatever it takes to win
  • Ensure you’re pointing the team in the right direction. Reward engineering velocity.
  • Execution Loop: Define >> Validate >> Iterate
  • #1 Goal: Increase execution loop velocity
  • Establish yourself as the curator, not the creator of great ideas. Everyone contributes great ideas.
  • First nail it, then scale it — first build software quickly (no elegance required in architecture, etc.), validate it, and then scale it with elegant architecture.
  • Invest in retrospectives

Hope you found this blog post useful. Thanks to Sachin Rekhi @sachinrekhi. Cheers!

 

 

 

 

Feature Prioritization *New*


Back in 2011, I made this blog post on prioritization of product features, and the prioritization template looked like this.

Over the years, I have been updating the format and refining it to ensure it articulates the objective prioritization and shepherds the product towards product-market fit — the latest is here.

In general, features will have to be categorized into three backlogs. The backlogs have been named by lifting NBA terminology for self explanation.

  • Offensive Play — features that aid revenue generation and acquire new customers
  • Defensive Play — features that aid in delighting and retaining existing customers
  • Time out — features that aid cost cutting such as those that reduce product returns, reduce customer service costs, improve operational efficiency, tech deprioritizationbt, etc.

Product Managers will have to ensure appropriate ‘plays’ are adopted depending on business needs, including a mix of features from more than one backlog in a release, for creating customer value, generating competitive advantage, and delivering profitability.

Few takeaways:

  • Strike the right balance between offensive and defensive plays
  • Features that can be implemented in a shorter time are *not* always the ‘right thing’ to do
  • Always look at relative priority and the objective impact a feature will have on customer value, ROI, and overall purpose

Would love to hear what’s on your mind!